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Overview of the Soils Report.

  The Soils (SSurgo) report is a report that is located within both Surety Customized Online Mapping and Surety Pro® Customized Online Mapping. The Soils report is used by growers (farmers), financial institutions, rural appraisers, insurance companies, auction companies, soil testing facilities, engineers, and cooperatives just to name a few. The Soils report utilizes soil survey data from NRCS (Source:http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/home)in all states.

A few highlights available on our soils report from the SSurgo database include the following:



The following are additional soils features provided from other sources.


Notices

  • The Nebraska (NE) NRCS No longer updates the yields in the Web soil Survey. The reason being that with the advancement of farming practices, the data quickly becomes out of date. Instead NRCS NE uses the National Commodity Crop Productivity Index (NCCPI) which uses natural relationships of soil, landscape and climate factors to model the response of commodity crops in soil map units. - Shurtliff, Daniel; NRCS, Lincoln, NE; 7/2/2014
  • EFOTG information for Indiana (IN) Soils -Click here to jump to informational section on the Field Office Technical Guide data.
  • Minnesota (MN) Soils PI inaccuracies. If you generate a Soil map in Minnesota using the Productivity Index, you will receive the following message:
    • We have just been made aware that the NRCS has released inaccurate Productivity indexes(PI) for MN. We recommend using the prior version of the soils database(2/5/2014) in our system. We will remove this message when we have received corrected PIs. The prior version of the soils database can be selected from a drop-down in the upper right hand corner of the soils report. If you don’t see this option select "Tools" from the menu on the main mapping page then "Options", "Options Page" and click the circle next to "print maps from a web page" and click "Save".
    • This notice has come about in response to inaccurate changes from the previous soils version. The values are wrong because they are using an interpretation designed for North Dakota soils. This system is not wrong when used within ND but when extended beyond the context of the rest of the soils in each particular state, it loses meaning/usefulness. The NRCS is aware of these issues and are working on updating the correct values in the database currently. A suggested solution to this is to use the National Commodity Crop Productivity Index (NCCPI). This has usefulness because the ratings are consistently applied across the country. It fails however, with Minnesota specific Soils because the query assumes no drainage of any kind. The result of this is that some of the better cropland is rated low because of wetness. Because of this, MN has decided to continue support of the Crop Productivity Index for the near future.
  • Ohio (OH) soils missing Yield and PI numbers - Soil types that have been reclassified by the NRCS no longer have crop yield information associated with it. This is due to inconsistencies between the same soil types in two states.

Previous Soil Version

The prior version of the soils database can be selected from a drop-down in the upper right hand corner of the soils report. If you don’t see this option select "Tools" from the menu on the main mapping page then "Options", "Options Page" and click the circle next to "print maps from a web page" and click "Save". See: Soils Map History & Version for more help.



When evaluating land the following should be considered.

Class and Subclass:

Class:Land capability classification shows, in a general way, the suitability of soils for most kinds of field crops. Crops that require special management are excluded. The soils are grouped according to their limitations for field crops, the risk of damage if they are used for crops, and the way they respond to management. The criteria used in grouping the soils do not include the major and generally expensive land forming that would change slope, depth, or other characteristics of the soils, nor do they include possible but unlikely major reclamation projects. Capability classification is not a substitute for interpretations that show suitability and limitations of groups of soils for range land, for woodland, or for engineering purposes.

In the capability system, soils are generally grouped at three levels-capability class, subclass, and unit. Only class and subclass  are included in this data set.

Capability classes, the broadest groups, are designated by the number 1 through 8

The numbers indicate progressively greater limitations and narrower choices for practical use. The classes are defined as follows:

  • Class 1 soils have few limitations that restrict their use.
  • Class 2 soils have moderate limitations that reduce the choice of plants or that require moderate conservation practices.
  • Class 3 soils have severe limitations that reduce the choice of plants or that require special conservation practices, or both.
  • Class 4 soils have very severe limitations that reduce the choice of plants or that require very careful management, or both.
  • Class 5 soils are subject to little or no erosion but have other limitations, impractical to remove, that restrict their use mainly to pasture, range land, forestland, or wildlife habitat.
  • Class 6 soils have severe limitations that make them generally unsuitable for cultivation and that restrict thier use mainly to pasture, range land, forestland, or wildlife habitat.
  • Class 7 soils have very severe limitations that make them unsuitable for cultivation and that restrict their use mainly to grazing, forestland, or wildlife habitat.
  • Class 8 soils and miscellaneous areas have limitations that preclude commercial plant production and that restrict their use to recreational purposes, wildlife habitat, watershed, or esthetic purposes.

Note: While NRCS reports up to 8 classes, there are actually a total of 12 classes. Therefore, our Soils report displays up to 12 classes. The classes 9-12 will be for granite and such and will benefit engineers the most.

Subclass:

Land capability classification shows, in a general way, the suitability of soils for most kinds of field crops. Crops that require special management are excluded. The soils are grouped according to their limitations for field crops, the risk of damage if they are used for crops, and the way they respond to management. The criteria used in grouping the soils do not include major and generally expensive land forming that would change slope, depth, or other characteristics of the soils, nor do they include possible but unlikely major reclamations projects. Capability classification is not a substitute for interpretations that show suitability and limitations of groups of soils for range land, for woodland, or for engineering purposes.  In the capability system, soils are generally grouped at three levels-capability class, subclass, and unit. Only class and subclass are included in this data set.

Capability sub-classes are soil groups within one capability class. They are designated by adding a small letter "e", "w", "s", or "c", to the class numeral, for example, 2e. The letter "e" shows that the main hazard is the risk of erosion unless close-growing plant cover is maintained; "w" shows that water in or on the soil interferes with plant growth or cultivation (in some soils the wetness can be partly corrected by artificial drainage); "s" shows that the soil is limited mainly because it is shallow, drought, or stony; and "c", used in only some parts of the United States, shows that the chief limitation is climate that is very cord or very dry.

In class 1 there are no sub-classes because the soils of this class have few limitations. Class 5 contains only the sub-classes indicated by "w", "s",or "c" because the soils in class 5 are subject to little or no erosion. They have other limitations that restrict their use to pasture, range land, forestland, or wildlife habitat. Source: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/home

Productivity Index

Exclusively used in ND, SD and MN. The Productivity Index is a way in which the NRCS assigns a productivity value to the soil on a 0 Worst - 100 Best rating scale.  See also: Soils Report Options. The coloring on the map is optional and can be set by productivity index to easily visualize the variability across the field. See also: Soil Color Options

The Productivity Index will appear on Soils reports that are generated for ND, SD, MN.

The Productivity Index will appear on Soils reports that are generated for ND, SD, MN.

 

South Dakota Productivity

South Dakota Productivity Index (PI) is a statewide PI index that is determined county by county.

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You can set the color options by going to the Soil Color Options Page.

Illinois Bulletin 811

These ratings only apply to Illinois soil. The rating range from 47 Worst - 147 Best. Source: http://soilproductivity.nres.illinois.edu, Retrieved (6 September 2012). In addition, you can pick and choose which crop yield information appears on the report. Manage this in the Soils Report Options Page under the tab Illinois Productivity

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The coloring on the map can also be modified according to Bulletin 811 ratings. See Soil Color Options.

Iowa CSR/CSR2 (Corn Suitability Rating)

This only applies to Iowa soils. It has a rating of 0 Worst - 100 Best. For more information visit: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/agdm/wholefarm/html/c2-86.html, Retrieved (6 September 2012)

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CSR2 is a newly released rating and it is based on a more objective (formula based analysis) where CSR had some subjectivity applied to the rating.

In addition, you can also select individual crops that you only want to see data for or you can select all the crops and if there is data available, it will be displayed on our report See also: Soils Report Options.

CSR & CSR2 data in included in the most recent Soil version of the Soils Data. If you are wanting to only access the CSR ratings. Choose the previous version from the Soil Version drop down. See Soils Version Selection for more information on that.

The coloring on the map is optional and it is so that the information can be discerned visually with relative ease on the map See also: Soil Color Options.

Changes in Iowa soils Corn Suitability Rating from CSR to CSR 2

At AgriData, Inc. one of our goals is to give you the most accurate and up-to-date information we can. We do this by keeping our soils data consistent and updated with the USDA NRCS databases and Web Soil Survey. This data is the official federal soils data. Each year the USDA| NRCS releases a large number of updates to their soils databases across the country. In particular, there have been some major changes to the data for Iowa in regards to the Iowa Corn Suitability Rating (CSR), removal of yield information, and a resurvey/reclassification of a couple of counties' soil series.

Iowa State University is responsible for keeping the CSR data. The NRCS receives the CSR values and inserts them into their databases. Over the past year, Iowa State has developed CSR 2 in an effort to make the ratings more consistent, easier to calculate and the values more transparent to the public.

Additionally, CSR 2 is designed to work with the changes the NRCS has made in the way they classify soils for a given area.

NRCS uses a more data driven approach today compared to the 1970's when CSR was first introduced. At that time, soils were assumed to be 90 to 100% the same throughout a given soil series and CSR was assigned to that series. Today, NRCS accounts for all inclusions in the sil series and uses weighted averages of the inclusions to describe the series creating an inconsistency with CSR and the way NRCS classifies soils. CSR 2 is designed to remedy that and be more site specific.

As of October 1, 2013, the official NRCS Productivity Rating for Iowa will be CSR 2 and this value will be used in all USDA programs in Iowa that use a Productivity Rating. Examples include CRP rental rates, nutrient management plans and EQIP.

The count assessors have maintained their own CSR values within their given county and use the Iowa interpretive soils database or ISPAID as their standard. We are told that ISPAID will be updated to include CSR 2 values and at that time assessors will begin to evaluate CSR 2.

At a AgriData, Inc., our standard is the USDA NRCS soils database so we will be including CSR 2 in our maps. In order to better communicate with you and your soils map customers, we will also have CSR data available. It is our understanding that CSR 2 will replace CSR in the NRCS data so please keep in mind that the two are not designed to be correlated.

For further information we recommend that you check Dr. Lee Burras' Iowa State Extension soils website at: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/soils/ and presentation http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/_repository/2012/soilmanagement/pdf/Burras.pdf

For additional information: http://www.dreamdirt.com/2012/08/26/iowas-new-csr2-how-does-it-affect-value/

Last Revised: 5/8/2014

Iowa ISPAID Crop Yield Data (Iowa Soil Properties and Interpretations Database)

Since there has been the CSR 2 data recently released, some of the yield information that has been removed has been requested to be still shown on Surety Soil Maps. To address these requests we have gathered data from the Iowa State ISPAID database.

If enabled in the Soil Options page under the Iowa ISPAID tab, then crop yields will appear alongside the CSR data.

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For More information on the ISPAID crop yield ratings, view the official manual from the Iowa State website. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Documents/soils/ISPAID_73man.doc

Nebraska SRPG (Soil Rating for Plant Growth)

The SRPG is specific to Nebraska Soils and is a measuring tool based on the analysis of the soils tests to ascertain the projected productivity of the cropland. See the dedicated page SRPG ratings for Nebraska Soils for more information.

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These ratings can be enabled in the Soil Options page.

Set the colors to be based on SRPG ratings in our Soil Color Options settings page.

====EFOTG Electronic Field Office Technical Guide Ratings for Indiana (IN) Corn==== The NRCS has temporarily removed some yield information from their Web Soil Survey Database including Corn yields on Indiana Soils. Because of this, we have contacted the Indiana State Soil scientist to get that information into our database again. The NRCS is currently using the EFOTG which has the most recent updates. We have incorporated this information for the Indiana Soils. They are displayed in a column titled "*efotg" This data is accessible at: http://efotg.sc.egov.usda.gov/treemenuFS.aspx The crop yield reports are in Section II, under the Detailed Soil Information - Property, Quality and Soil Interpretations tab, by individual county tabs, then Crop yields.

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No Data Available

In some parts of the country, there is no data available in the Web Soil Survey Database. The soils map will then read "No Digital Data Available".
No Data for selected soils

No Data for selected soils


See Also: Visual Guide to Understanding the Soils Report Layout  

  Name Size
- CSR2.jpg 292.06 KB
- InCorn_EFTOG.png 100.47 KB
- ISPAID.png 119.92 KB
- NDSDMNPI.PNG 103.30 KB
- NoData.png 54.64 KB
- Soil Report explaination.png 372.78 KB
- SoilsreportBulletin811.PNG 122.94 KB
- SoilsreportCSR.PNG 206.43 KB
- SoilsreportCSR2.PNG 189.54 KB
- SoilsreportSRPG.PNG 155.73 KB
- SoilsSDPI.PNG 91.63 KB